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Promoting Broadband Access: Educators as Dreamers & Activists - Shared screen with speaker view
Bryan Alexander
28:15
Good afternoon from northeastern Virginia.
Jan Schiller
28:37
Hello everyone! From Wisconsin, USA
Cristiana Assumpcao
28:46
Good afternoon from Florida.
Jim Heid
30:47
Good morning from Albion, CA (pop. 168), where an innovative WISP is bringing the broadband!
Bryan Alexander
31:50
Here’s my EDUCAUSE Review article on the topic: https://er.educause.edu/articles/2017/10/higher-education-digital-divides-and-a-balkanized-internet
Dan Bassill
31:50
Hello to all from the Chicago region.
Paul Signorelli
32:00
Great to see you here.
Brent Scholar
32:05
Infrastructure
William Stein
32:06
geography
Riad Twal
32:07
monopoly
Damian Bebell
32:12
Cost and Access
Bryan Alexander
32:12
1) Living in rural America.
Steven Burrell
32:12
Failed Markets
William Stein
32:13
lack of viable options
Brent Scholar
32:14
Knowledge
Tom Adams
32:15
It’s not available
Paul Bakalis
32:17
Distribution Infrastructure
William Stein
32:19
low income
Arlene Krebs
32:19
access, technology, skills, geography
Richard Gould
32:22
cost and access
Chris Johnson
32:23
Access to internet -
Jan Schiller
32:23
Geography/internet access is not offered in their area
Tony Schloss
32:23
Choice for consumers that lowers expense
Steven Burrell
32:24
Legal issues with right-of-way
Dan Bassill
32:27
Lack of hardware; internet connections;
Tanya Joosten
32:27
Capitalism
Tony Schloss
32:30
and increases quality
Arlene Krebs
32:34
training
Jim Heid
32:35
Lack of interest from major teleco providers in providing access to rural and low-income areas
Bryan Alexander
32:37
2) Bad ISP behavior.
Patrina Yang
32:38
Poor infrastructure in rural areas
Kathy Marks
32:38
Could the host please enable Live Transcripts to make captions available to participants?
Jan Schiller
32:42
Economics/can't afford it.
Chris Johnson
32:48
Might remind folks to change to Panelist and Attendees
Paul Signorelli
32:48
Glad you're here; thanks for taking the time to join this conversation.
Bryan Alexander
32:48
3) Monopolists.
Jim Heid
33:06
geographical challenges in rural areas (WISPs are great but require line of sight, for example)
Rocky Cifone
33:09
Cost, access, infrastructure, socio-economic status
Jan Schiller
33:13
Lack of competition/providers have a geographic monopoly
Steven Burrell
33:26
Lack of clear federal policy and enforcement of merger agreements (e.g. Sprint/TMobile obligation to serve rural markets)
Paul Signorelli
33:27
Glad you're here. Looking forward to having you participate via chat.
Bryan Alexander
33:37
The geographical issue is really important.
Ruben Puentedura
33:55
Thank you for the thoughtful answers, everyone - please keep them coming.
Bryan Alexander
34:07
4) Privatization of broadband market.
Lisa Gustinelli
34:21
Your insights are spot on. Glad you are all here.
Dan Bassill
34:29
I've aggregated links to digital divide issues in concept map at http://tinyurl.com/TMI-DigitalDivide-Issues
Tony Schloss
35:43
Today, ISP’s provide the data for coverage and quality-consumers need to be the data providers
Brent Scholar
36:45
@ Dan BAssill this is great. How can you be attribute to this, or can you add that to it, as I would like to use this with other groups.
Tanya Joosten
37:14
Can someone post the link that Laura just shared in the chat? Thanks!
Jan Schiller
37:20
@DanBassill, awesome concept map!
Laura Geringer | she/her
37:41
https://shapingedu.asu.edu/project/universal-broadband-access-us
Dan Bassill
38:47
Feel free to share my concept maps widely. Just include link back to the original maps when possible. My goal is that others create their own versions. See whole library at http://tutormentorexchange.net/conceptmaps
Tony Schloss
39:04
@DanBassill—yes, a great resource. But a typo in title (Digitital)
Bryan Alexander
40:34
I think a good number of people would actually approve of bad internet access. Lots of othering going on.
Ruben Puentedura
42:09
Unfortunately so, Bryan.
Bryan Alexander
42:28
Bathroom? Like the opening scene of _Parasite_.
Bryan Alexander
43:04
Dan, which concept map tool did you use to make those?
Paul Signorelli
44:17
Tom: Great to see you here; glad you could join us.
Chris Johnson
44:44
I have a story - A teacher I’m working with is on the Navajo Reservation at a residential school. THey have hot spots to distribute but most of the content goes out on flash drives. A week or so ago, she drove out to deliver a drive (The child had a hotspot but he has to hike a half mile up a hill to use if). The trip was 20 mikes and it took her 5 hours (dirt roads min the snow)
Tom Haymes
45:00
Even in a large urban area like Houston my students struggle to find reliable internet access.
Laura Geringer | she/her
45:26
Thank you for sharing.
Laura Geringer | she/her
46:07
If you want to share a story for the storybook we’re putting together (and will share with the FCC), you can share your story: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeHilPBenWY0yktoM5EeOY58I56q9dH1ZXk-nvp0877WUTDNg/viewform?usp=sf_link
Laura Geringer | she/her
46:21
I also encourage you to share your story directly with the FCC if you choose
Dan Bassill
46:22
I use cMapTools. I was able to open my cMap and edit the Digital mis-spelling in just the few minutes since being informed. That's how easy these are to create and update.
Paul Signorelli
46:54
Lisa's story is a great illustration of the power of collaboration and simply reaching out. Lots of great people have been working on this issue for a long time. We're reaching out to them--and them to us--to make a difference.
Bryan Alexander
47:29
Thanks, Dan.
Tom Haymes
47:37
Covid has really demonstrated how dependent many of our students are dependent on libraries, schools, and campuses for broadband access.
Bryan Alexander
48:03
There are a bunch of practices out there -
Dan Bassill
48:20
In higher education what efforts are made to enlist students/faculty from business school, journalism, arts, etc. who are learning skills of communicating to the public. Building public will is the big challenge and many advocates have too few resources and too little influence.
Bryan Alexander
48:25
a) Using asynchronous tech (which is lower bandwidth)
Chris Johnson
48:51
I met Chairwomen Rosenworcel through an ISTE/COSN Day on the Hill activity. Has Shaping EDU reached out to ISTE? If not, you should.
Bryan Alexander
48:52
B) ship hardware to students - access points, or iPads stuffed with cell phone subscription
Bryan Alexander
49:14
C) Setting up access stations, inc. at libraries or using buses.
Tom Haymes
49:23
With our fractured internet environment we have a poor understanding of the scope of the problem. Students may have broadband one day and not the next due to payment issues or moving from place to place.
Arlene Krebs
49:30
Provide technology to ALL students. I once started a Tech Rent Store where students could rent a laptop for $100 a year…as well as other devices—video cameras for their course projects, hard drives, thumb drives, mics, lights, portable projectors for presentations etc. So there are ways to help students get devices
Bryan Alexander
49:32
d) Going old school to print (some tribal colleges)
Lisa Gustinelli
49:58
I am am ISTE certified educator and was just appointed as a seal of alignment app reviewer. I am also on the COSN K-12 Innovation advisory. I'm very much involved in both.
Patricia Lauziere
49:58
Students not only access but education about how technology is used.
Cristiana Assumpcao
50:05
It would be worth looking at previous projects and what other countries have tried, such as the OLPC in countries such as Uruguay - learn from what succeeded and what failed.
Dan Bassill
50:22
It takes 12 years for each student to go from first grade through HS. How many upgrades of hardware/software would he/she need? Who will pay for it if family income is below poverty level?
Tony Schloss
50:34
e) shift the economics of the Internet-ISP’s benefit from our data. Instead, users should be rewarded for providing that data.
Jan Schiller
50:52
Are there any lessons learned from ASU and/or Arizona's 'sister" universities and cities?
Brent Scholar
51:06
Hardware can be provided but if people do not know how to use it will not matter. There needs to be education and support too.
Jan Schiller
51:29
@Dan, good question. Seems also applicable to adults working remotely...
Jan Schiller
52:36
@Tony, agree. Applicable to every company that 'mines' our personal data. My personal data is mine and is not free.
Cristiana Assumpcao
52:46
In developing countries larger projects are using cell phone as hardware, because that’s something that’s already in the hands of the students. Big Telecommunications companies have started Foundations to partner and promote education.
Patricia Lauziere
53:05
Many students felt overwhelmed with the amount of new information. How do we help simplify how to we use technology and streamline all of the resources that are currently available?
Brent Scholar
53:26
I like going back to paper in schools especially K-12. I am reading The Coddling of the American Mind and how there is too much focus on skills to get ahead ignoring soft skills like building relationships. I never had homework in the early years and if I did, it was little except studying for a test. A focus on us being anti-fragile needs to be reintroduced and with that, we can be innovative and find a solution.
Ruben Puentedura
53:30
Cristiana, I couldn’t agree more - the value of international experience in this regard is immense.
Bryan Alexander
54:13
Cristiana, one difference is that other nations decided to maintain some public support for broadband.
William Stein
54:29
ConnectMV.org is our program that helps but is not a perm. solution.
Rocky Cifone
54:33
@laura —This is a huge point.
Arlene Krebs
54:35
Obviously technology—digital skills training—is essential and students are so instructed, especially with Internet Safety, Google docs, etc. I am now working on a new project “Connecting Seniors with Technology” teaching basic and intermediate skills and providing devices to those who have none! and helping them connect to the Net. The generational gap, and the impact of the pandemic has made this foremost cuz of our elders isolation, emotional and mental stress etc.
Adero Allison
54:54
Even cell phone access is limited by economics and family preference. Children in one family may have a personal phone at 5 while another family may wait unit the child is a teen (age and maturity) or has a job (contributing to the family economics).
Ruben Puentedura
55:19
True, Bryan - but projects involving plain old cell phones (not smartphones) also have much to say in this context.
Jan Schiller
55:20
@Brent, agree that getting ahead should not be the primary motivation for education. Both of my (now adult) children had so much homework they had to bring it on family vacations in order to complete it. They also had backpacks heavy enough to cause aches and pains...so def glad for online in that sense.
Bryan Alexander
55:27
Lots of good stuff in this chat!
Richard Gould
55:49
Cristiana, I agree, building new infrastructure is prohibitive, using existing infrastructure that is more easily available, such as cell phones. If we can turn low cost cell phones into usable devices to learn on inexpensively would be idea.
Dan Bassill
55:51
Until mapping is developed that shows access, at the neighborhood, or even household level, it will be difficult to assure that ALL who need help gaining digital access are getting it. Anyone know of such platforms?
Bryan Alexander
56:02
Agreed, Dan.
Cristiana Assumpcao
56:10
@Brent Scholar, the other thing I like about paper in K-12 is the balance of digital and analog. Kids need hands-on to develop essential skills at that stage of development - visual-spatial ability, fine motor skills, use of different senses to increase cognitive development etc.
Paul Signorelli
56:28
Hope people will use the chat to make long-term connections to promote universal broadband access throughout the U.S. ..and, obviously, join us at our Tuesday afternoon planning meetings to push us toward this goal.
Bryan Alexander
56:44
Ruben, cell phone projects run into a stack of other problems, inc.. privatized cell networks in the US.
Dan Bassill
56:53
What is the hashtag that unites this conversation on Twitter?
William Stein
57:05
#homeworkgap ?
Lisa Gustinelli
57:20
#digtialaffluence
Arlene Krebs
57:24
Yes Dan, many states have mapped underserved areas as have the FCC….even though there are problems with mapping (i.e. one service provider serving a specific area within a region) however, every state has policy and infrastructure plans.
Lisa Gustinelli
57:27
#digitalpoverty
Lisa Gustinelli
57:36
#digitaldivide
Bryan Alexander
57:47
Remember that ISPs successfully sued and lobbied to block cities and towns from floating public access.
Paul Signorelli
57:48
#BroadbandAccess #DigitalAffluence
Tom Haymes
57:54
@Cristiana - Couldn’t agree more. I hope once our current situation passes that we develop a more nuanced appreciation of a range of tools ranging from the tactile to the distributed than we had before. Tech is not either/or.
Jan Schiller
57:57
NYC's wifi everywhere must not be via a municipal ISP...
Brent Scholar
57:59
@Paul how can be join us on Tuesdays?
Tom Adams
58:03
Yes, the ISPs have been incredibly orchestrated in their opposition to municipal broadband.
Lisa Gustinelli
58:04
@JRosenworcel She is the Acting Chairwoman of the FCC
Richard Gould
58:11
Cristiana, I agree, building new infrastructure is prohibitive, using existing infrastructure that is more easily available, such as cell phones. If we can turn low cost cell phones into usable devices to learn on inexpensively would be idea.
Cristiana Assumpcao
58:12
@Bryan Alexander - the idea is to learn from what they did in other countries, and get the lessons learned and see what we can bring to the U.S.
Bryan Alexander
58:17
Friends, I have a Future Trends Forum session to run.
Jim Heid
58:28
In our community of Mendocino, CA (150 north of SF), our largest local ISP is run by the local school district — they formed in the mid-90s to provide local dialup, and are still thriving. Profits help support the school district. http://www.mcn.org/
Paul Signorelli
58:33
Laura: Can you add the link to our project page here for those who want to join us? Thanks.
Bryan Alexander
58:37
Cristiana, I understand that. I was pointing out one difference we can detect in that comparison.
Bryan Alexander
58:43
Take care, all. Vital topic!
Dan Bassill
58:45
Has anyone developed a connection between "internet access" issues and "healthcare access" issues? Seems like the same people are disconnected, and for many of the same reasons coming from capitalist mindset in America.
William Stein
59:35
focus on the money last
William Stein
59:41
AGREED!
Tom Haymes
59:42
We need to attack the system effectively, not frontally.
Tony Schloss
59:44
The business model of the internet handicaps universal broadband access—this is what needs to change (in my opinion)
Patricia Lauziere
59:45
Dan, absolutely! and to job loss as well...students could not pay their internet and lost it.
Lisa Gustinelli
59:48
@Dan so true think about the elderly who could not sign up for Covid Vaccines online
Jim Heid
01:00:12
Dan, that’s a frighteningly accurate parallel. Where population density is light and/or income is low, people suffer.
Tom Adams
01:00:12
Is rallying behind a central idea that broadband is a utility to which we are all reasonably entitled a useful general stance?
Tom Haymes
01:00:16
@Tony - the business model is broken because business breaks in monopoly circumstances.
Tom Haymes
01:00:46
I essentially have one choice for broadband - Comcast.
Jan Schiller
01:00:48
@Dan, agree there is a connection between internet and healthcare access. What can be done to ensure everyone has the access to basic needs supporting a healthy life? Given its pervasiveness, I think internet access has now become
Jan Schiller
01:00:51
basic.
Tom Haymes
01:01:00
We have a local DSL provider but they are slow and very unreliable.
Tom Haymes
01:01:16
1 is better than Zero, though.
Cristiana Assumpcao
01:01:21
Very true @Tom
Tony Schloss
01:01:41
@Tom—Agreed. Plus they benefit from our data. My children, in their remote learning are now more Google consumers. Its ugly
Dan Bassill
01:01:58
I would love to see ASU create concept maps to show all the ideas they are trying to connect and all the people who are connected, or who need to be connected. Students could do this work.
Damian Bebell
01:02:03
To Dan- Horowtiz, J. M. (2020). Lower-income parents most concerned about their children fallingbehind amid COVID-19 school closures. Pew Research Center. Retrieved from:https://pewrsr.ch/2K72Oc3
Paul Signorelli
01:02:23
Exactly, Tom. 1 is better than 0. And our next step is to find a way to demonstrate that 2 is even better than 1, however we can make that work. We need to dream. We need to drive. We need to push toward our goal and find ways to overcome the barriers we encounter.
Damian Bebell
01:02:23
-Brookings (2020). Digital Properity: How Broadband Can Deliver Health and Equity to All Communities. https://www.brookings.edu/research/digital-prosperity-how-broadband-can-deliver-health-and-equity-to-all-communities/
Brent Scholar
01:02:37
@Dan please join us and help us create those maps!
Paul Signorelli
01:03:06
@Dan: Would love to have you bring our shared #etmooc experience to this project and this (ShapingEDU) community.
Brent Scholar
01:03:08
We are building a course to educate people about creating digital affluence they might be a good addition.
Dan Bassill
01:03:49
I'm @tutormentorteam on Twitter. Let's connect and figure how to connect.
Patricia Lauziere
01:04:02
People may not have internet/ or even video access for tele-health visits for example.
Damian Bebell
01:04:06
Abbott-Garner, Philip, Richardson, Janet, & Jones, Ray B. (2019). The Impact of Superfast Broadband, Tailored Booklets for Households, and Discussions With General Practitioners on Personal Electronic Health Readiness: Cluster Factorial Quasi-Randomized Control Trial. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 21(3), e11386–e11386. https://doi.org/10.2196/11386
Paul Signorelli
01:04:18
Dan: Pump me via paul@paulsignorelli.com if we don't get you into this quickly.
Lisa Gustinelli
01:05:17
and my twitter is @techzebu Please share your stories on the ShapingEDU page We have a link for story sharing there
Laura Geringer | she/her
01:05:18
https://shapingedu.asu.edu/project/black-swan-thinking-project
Paul Signorelli
01:05:35
That antifragile approach Ruben is describing is at the heart of the approach we're taking: come of the pandemic stronger as a result of having built upon positive lessons learned.
Rocky Cifone
01:05:52
The broadband business model is archaic. One reason is that it is regarded as a luxury as opposed to a necessity. Communication providers are legally provide “lifeline” service re telephone connection, related in California by the Public Utilities Commission. Why not at least the same for basic and reliable broadband access?
Paul Signorelli
01:05:52
...come out of the pandemic...
Lisa Gustinelli
01:06:14
@ Rocky so true!
Laura Geringer | she/her
01:07:00
You can find recordings from recent Black Swan Thinking Foundations sessions (in English | French | Spanish) here: https://shapingedu.asu.edu/live/2021-03-03-BlackSwan
Tom Haymes
01:07:12
Broadband access needs to be fundamental data point that all institutions of learning track - K-20+. This data could be used to put pressure on decision makers as it will shift the discussion decisively toward broadband as a fundamental need rather than a luxury that people use to watch Netflix.
Lisa Gustinelli
01:07:58
@Tom and you know the tools for learning with broadband must be in place as well
Tony Schloss
01:08:09
Red Hook WIFI in Brookyn is a black swan, I believe-created just before Hurricane Sandy, it then became a lifeline in the recovery period. Now it has expanded its coverage, added solar power for increased resilience, and serves local businesses and residents. Still, it is not serving public housing residents in their homes, where it is needed most. Our current focus…
Anna Mrowka
01:09:13
Hi, a quick reminder if you have any specific questions for our panelists during our Q&A section, please utilize the Zoom Q&A function (you can also upvote other questions). Thanks!
Tom Haymes
01:09:31
Can we create a clearinghouse for data to determine which institutions (higher ed, school districts, etc.) have populations that lack broadband. We know this anecdotally but it’s an easy data point to collect.
Ruben Puentedura
01:10:01
Damian, thank you for the research paper links - we’ll make sure everyone gets them with the rest of the session materials.
Laura Geringer | she/her
01:10:08
Join the project team: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe049skUr_i7iJhwaCToBFx4X3FBr_3bVRZOaC10qgIBegkKA/viewform?usp=sf_link
Arlene Krebs
01:10:12
There are policies that are or need to be in place: 1-Dig Once with street repairs/infrastructure=fiber to be laid. Difficult cuz it means local, state, regional policy agreements. 2-All Public Housing gets infrastructure with individual apartment getting WiFi access; 3-schools as community ISPs and device providers. Public funding at local, state, national levels necessary…and maybe the new “infrastructure bill” will address some of this
Lisa Gustinelli
01:10:26
Welcome! Please do join us!
Dan Bassill
01:11:00
Are any of you aware of this "connecting papers" site for aggregating research papers? https://www.connectedpapers.com/main/d8e7b7c83a662887e564edf26b9502e31d35299c/Keeping-People-Involved-Creating-a-New-Model-for-Service-Organizations/graph
Laura Geringer | she/her
01:11:24
Sign up for the free course: https://courses.cpe.asu.edu/browse/uto/courses/shapingedu-universal-broadband-access
Laura Geringer | she/her
01:12:27
https://shapingedu.asu.edu/blog/letter-support-universal-broadband-us
Damian Bebell
01:12:51
I love sharing research, Ruben :) We are conducting an evaluation study of the HCS EdConnect broadband initiative in Chattanooga, so we are collating a lot of research and evaluation resources that we look forward to sharing in the near future!
Laura Geringer | she/her
01:12:56
Share your story: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeHilPBenWY0yktoM5EeOY58I56q9dH1ZXk-nvp0877WUTDNg/viewform?usp=sf_link
Laura Geringer | she/her
01:13:52
https://shapingedu.asu.edu/event/developing-telling-stories-broadband-access
Roberta (Robin) Sullivan
01:14:42
Thank you for sharing these great action-focused resources!
Richard Gould
01:16:12
What about public access to something like Starlink or 5G?
Tom Haymes
01:16:38
We need to collect that data.
Rocky Cifone
01:16:40
Thank you for the email template.
Arlene Krebs
01:16:54
Internet access via Satellite has been happening for many years…excellent for developing nations that hopskip infrastructure/topography issues. When you fly and enjoy wifi, it’s via satellite. A reliable tech for very remote and difficult to access areas.
Laura Geringer | she/her
01:17:01
Customize it, make it your own!
Laura Geringer | she/her
01:17:02
:-)
Lisa Gustinelli
01:17:57
I had a student at FAU who had to stay on campus because she had no access at home
Brent Scholar
01:18:36
It is $99 for Starlink today, but that will probably come down and then perhaps in the future the FCC subsidy can be applied to it as well. It is one option but our systems need to be made more equal and accessible. As discussed USPS for the last mile and the electrification of the US. It’s time to Connectify us. (Is that word?)
Rocky Cifone
01:18:59
The broadband business model is archaic. One reason is that it is regarded as a luxury as opposed to a necessity. Communication providers have “lifeline” service re telephone connection, regulated in California by the Public Utilities Commission. We need at least the same for basic and reliable broadband access.
Tom Haymes
01:19:08
Technology is a bigger issue for CC students.
Lisa Gustinelli
01:19:10
@Brent, imagine if Starlink was free
Tom Haymes
01:19:18
I had students taking classes on their phone.
Paul Bakalis
01:19:34
The $99 should be underwritten to create equity across the learning enterprise.
Rocky Cifone
01:19:36
@TomHaymes Yes — historically
Lisa Gustinelli
01:19:39
Google tried with Google Loom but had to stop because of international air regulations
Tom Haymes
01:20:17
CCs would have been well-served to partially open campuses for informal learning and access under safe conditions. Classes can be replicated online. Informal learning and access cannot.
Patricia Lauziere
01:21:10
@Tom - same here. Food insecurity and homelessness also increased during the Pandemic.
Cristiana Assumpcao
01:22:47
I have another meeting, but thank you everyone for the great webinar!
Lisa Gustinelli
01:22:57
Nothing is free so Satellite broadband is not automatic, some countries are not interested in helping their citizens connect
Patrina Yang
01:23:12
Thank you for a highly educational webinar.
Leesa Riviere
01:23:26
Thank you all!
Jim Heid
01:23:53
This has been excellent — thank you! I would like to share the recording with our local county supervisor, who is very committed to broadband buildout in our rural county.
Tony Schloss
01:24:01
thank you everyone
Patricia Lauziere
01:24:01
Informative session, thank you.
Paul Signorelli
01:24:09
So nice to see the robust exchanges inspired by this session. Thanks, Laurie, for making it happen. Hope to see everyone in our ongoing meetings and other activities.
Mona Sampson
01:24:14
Thank you for the enlightenment and opportunity to participate
Laura Geringer | she/her
01:24:24
https://shapingedu.asu.edu/project/universal-broadband-access-us
Lisa Gustinelli
01:24:25
Please do join us on Tuesdays!
Paul Signorelli
01:25:03
Tuesday meetings: 4 pm ET/1 pm PT, with plenty of opps for asynchronous discussions via Slack and other tools.
Mary Lang
01:25:06
great, thanks Laura, Lisa, Paul and all!
Dan Bassill
01:25:10
Thank you all.
Jim Heid
01:25:21
*applause*
Chris Johnson
01:25:22
Thanks
Brent Scholar
01:25:23
Thank you
Roberta (Robin) Sullivan
01:25:26
Thank you!